How did the women’s rights movement of the 1960’s begin quizlet?

What caused the women’s liberation movement of the 1960s?

In Europe, the women’s liberation movement started in the late 1960s and continued through the 1980s. Inspired by events in North America and triggered by the growing presence of women in the labor market, the movement soon gained momentum in Britain and the Scandinavian countries.

What factors led to the emergence of the women’s rights movement quizlet?

Also, during the middle decades of the century, people were preoccupied with the Great Depression and World War II. The civil rights movement and the earlier women’s suffrage movement inspired the women’s movement. The movement gave women greater political and social equality.

How did women’s rights change in the 1960s?

Gradually, Americans came to accept some of the basic goals of the Sixties feminists: equal pay for equal work, an end to domestic violence, curtailment of severe limits on women in managerial jobs, an end to sexual harassment, and sharing of responsibility for housework and child rearing. .

What did the women’s rights movement accomplish?

Congress finally ratified the 19th Amendment in 1920, granting women across the United States the right to vote and moving one step closer toward equality for women.

THIS IS IMPORTANT:  What are the main elements of feminism?

How did the women’s rights movement began in the United States quizlet?

Her Declaration of Sentiments, presented at the Seneca Falls Convention held in 1848 in Seneca Falls, New York, is often credited with initiating the first organized women’s suffrage movement in the United States.

How was the women’s movement influenced by the civil rights movement?

Women played a crucial role in galvanizing the Civil Rights Movement. While resulting legislation such as the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act was a win for African Americans of both genders, they were particularly symbolic for women. … She thought this was important in order to vote and gain other rights.