Why did Woodrow Wilson not support women’s rights?

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Why did President Wilson support the Nineteenth Amendment?

President Wilson supported the 19th Amendment in that women deserve the right to participate, women shared the burden of supporting the nation, and it would be hypocritical to deny women the right to vote.

Did Wilson support women’s rights?

On September 30, 1918, President Woodrow Wilson gives a speech before Congress in support of guaranteeing women the right to vote. … Wilson had actually maintained a somewhat lukewarm attitude toward women’s suffrage throughout his first term (1913-1917).

Why did President Wilson eventually support the women’s right to vote?

It was not until his speech before Congress in 1918, that Wilson finally publicly endorsed woman’s suffrage by the federal government. It is believed that women’s roles during World War I helped Wilson see the need for suffrage.

Who didn’t support the 19th Amendment and why?

Much of the opposition to the amendment came from Southern Democrats; only two former Confederate states (Texas and Arkansas) and three border states voted for ratification, with Kentucky and West Virginia not doing so until 1920. Alabama and Georgia were the first states to defeat ratification.

What arguments were used to support women’s right to vote?

Instead of promoting a vision of gender equality, suffragists usually argued that the vote would enable women to be better wives and mothers. Women voters, they said, would bring their moral superiority and domestic expertise to issues of public concern.

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Who opposed women’s suffrage in America?

One of the most important anti-suffragist activists was Josephine Jewell Dodge, a founder and president of the National Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage. She came from a wealthy and influential New England family; her father, Marshall Jewell, served as a governor of Connecticut and U.S. postmaster general.