Who is the intended audience of Mary Wollstonecraft’s writings?

Who was Mary Wollstonecraft’s intended audience?

Wollstonecraft’s audience is composed of both men and women. Her direct attack is on rationalists whose position and beliefs are not rational. Her attack is not against rationalism. The reason for changing the traditional view of women will be that it is irrational not to change.

What was Mary Wollstonecraft’s purpose in writing this letter?

Wollstonecraft’s goal was not to undermine the role of women in the home—although at times throughout Vindication it seems she is doing just that—but, rather, her goal was to encourage society to recognize women as a valuable resource.

What is Mary Wollstonecraft’s claim in her argument quizlet?

In a Vindication of the Rights of Woman, Mary Wollstonecraft denies that women are, by nature, physically weaker than men. Given the right exercise regimen, she argues, females could become every bit as strong as males.

How does Wollstonecraft use rhetoric effectively to persuade the reader?

How does Wollstonecraft use rhetoric effectively to persuade the reader? Drawing from other known works and social opinions, Wollstonecraft creates arguments that will efficiently reach her intended audience. In Vindication, rhetorical appeals such as ethos, logos, and pathos play upon the audience.

THIS IS IMPORTANT:  What happened in 1890 for women's rights?

Who was the audience for A Vindication of the Rights of Woman?

“A Vindication of the Rights of Woman” is directed towards a primary audience of those interested in women’s education. Beyond this, Wollstonecraft aims to reach the widest possible audience in order to effect change and employs a wide range of arguments to convince diverse groups of people.

Who Wrote Frankenstein?

How did people react to Wollstonecraft’s ideas?

How did contemporary readers react to Vindication? The reaction to Vindication in Wollstonecraft’s lifetime was positive in her own liberal intellectual dissenting circle, but otherwise very negative. Horace Walpole notably referred to her in one of his letters as a ‘hyena in petticoats’.