What limitations on women’s rights did many activists find unacceptable quizlet?

How did the abolitionist movement influence the women’s rights movement quizlet?

How did the fight to end slavery help spark the women’s movement? “Women who fought to end slavery began to recognize their own bondage.” The abolitionist movement helped women see the discrimination they encountered in their own lives, and they organized to end this discrimination.

Why did some northern workers oppose the abolitionist movement?

Northern workers were opposed to the abolition of slavery because of the founded fear that free slaves could take their jobs. They knew that slaves will work for free so, they represented an economic threat to them.

What was a cause of the spread of the abolition movement quizlet?

What was a cause of the spread of the abolition movement? Several publications in the mid-1800s made the cruelties of slavery public in the North.

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How did the utopian communities challenge existing ideas about property and marriage?

The utopian communities challenge existing ideas about property and marriage by prohibiting sexual relations between men and women altogether, others allowed them to change partners at will and the abolition of private property must be accompanied by an end to men’s property in women.

What limitations of women’s rights did many activists find unacceptable?

Many activists, both men and women, found it unacceptable that women were not allowed to vote or sit on juries. They were also upset that married women in many states had little or no control over their own property. Like the abolitionist movement, the struggle for women’s rights faced opposition.

How did the abolitionist movement affect the women’s rights movement?

Abolitionist men supported women and gave them a platform to engage publicly for the cause of abolition and women’s rights. The issue of women’s rights was promoted through likeminded abolitionist men such as William Lloyd Garrison and Frederick Douglass.

Why did Northern workers oppose the abolition of slavery quizlet?

Why did many northern workers oppose the abolition movement? Some Northern Americans feared that freed slaves would move north and take jobs from white workers. They also believed that freed slaves would be willing to take lower wages in order to get work in the North.

How did some northern workers feel about the abolitionist movement?

skepticism and a certain indifference, but not a hostility. However, some labor leaders and their followers exhibited an active hostility to the abolitionists and sought to impede their progress whenever possible.

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Why did many native born citizens feel threatened by newly arrived immigrants?

Why did many native-born citizens feel threatened by newly arrived immigrants? They feared having to pay higher labor costs to employ skilled immigrants. They feared losing their jobs to immigrants who would work for less money.

How did abolitionists affect the civil war?

Abolitionists were a key part of the Civil War era, though it is hard to say that they caused the war itself. … Not only did abolitionists produce more militant attacks on slavery in the years leading to the Civil War, but they often vilified slaveholders themselves as the embodiment of evil.

How did advocates for women’s rights in these years challenge existing gender beliefs and social roles?

How did advocated for women’s rights in these years both accept and challenge existing gender beliefs and social roles? … Parallel visions of freedom, self-ownership, the right to vote, and the idea of being equals with white men were discussed transatlanticly as many people questioned their society’s rigid standards.

How have religious reformers made a difference in American society?

How have religious reformers made a difference in American society? They spearheaded the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s. They created the Social Gospel that sought to improve the lives of working people and immigrants. … The Shakers were the most successful of the religious “utopian” communities.